Baby Foot is the best thing EVER!

August 18, 2016
One of the things I learned the hard way (over time, of course) is that getting super soft feet is not as hard (pardon the pun) as one would imagine. As an athlete slash college sophomore 15 (!!!) years ago, I reckon saving my allowance just so I can afford my much awaited, biweekly foot spa. As embarrassing as it is, all those hours playing in the Rizal Memorial Coliseum and walking along Taft Avenue took a toll on my feet. I've tried everything back then -- foot spa, paraffin dips, wraps, cocoa and shea butter, petroleum jelly and socks at night. While the effect will be immediate, I relapse just as fast as well. :(

Fast forward to 2014, I got to try derma peels designed for the feet. To me, they were life changing. While safe, the only con is that it can be pricey. I saw and tried some DIY foot peel packs (the ones from Foot Appeal, Etude House, Nature Republic to name a few) and thought I'd share the best in my books.


Baby Foot is the best thing that will EVER happen to your dry and perpetually callused feet. Trust me.
A Japanese product that is famous for removing hard, dry and rough callouses on your feet in just 3 easy steps; Wear, Soak for 30 minutes and Rinse. It sheds off the unwanted dead foot skin by using 17 types of natural fruit acids in its formulation making the feet moisturized right after peeling. It is widely known for being safe and effective for having a higher pH value as 3.5 pH, close to human skin and it also help cure athletes’ foot.


Unless you can read Japanese characters, the box doesn't say much how to use Baby Foot save for some photos of what to expect. Opening the box, you will get an instruction sheet and the plastic booties in a foil pack.
Ingredients:
Water, alcohol, lactic acid, arginine, butylene glycol, peg-60 hydrogenated castor oil, glucose, o-cymen-5-ol, citric acid, malic acid, citrus aurantium dulcis (orange) peel oil, citrus grandis (grapefruit) peel oil, dipotassium glycyrrhizate, cymbopogon schoenanthus (lemon grass) oil, nasturt ium officinale (watercress) extract, arcrtium lappa (burdock) root extract, saponaria offcinalis (soapwort) leaf extract, hedera helix (ivy) extract, salvia officinalis (sage) leaf extract, citrus medica limonum (lemon) fruit extract, clematis vitalba (travelers joy) leaf extract, glycolic acid, spiraea ulmaria (meadowsweet), equisetum arvense (puzle grass) extract, chamomilla recutita (matricaria) flower extract, camellia sinensis (green tea) leaf extract, houttuynia cordata (chameleon) extract, phenoxyethanol, hydroxyethylcellulose, salicylic acid, fucus vesiculosus (bladderwrack), glycerine, bis-ethoxydiglycol cyclohexane 1,4-dicarboxylate, isopropyl alcohol, potassium hydroxide, fragrance

Open the foil pack carefully as you might nick the plastic booties!


This pair of plastic socks are responsible for all this madness. Just cut the top portion, insert your clean and towel dried feet on each sock, soak for 30-40 minutes, and rinse your feet with water. Sit pretty and wait 3-4 days for the first signs of peeling to start then let Baby Foot work its magic. Here are some tips I picked up along the way:
  • Do not use Baby Foot when you have an open wound on the surface the plastic socks will cover.
  • Don't overdo it because you don't have to. Peeling lasts for 2 weeks but the softness and smoothness lasts for 3 months (longest lasting among the brands I tried).
  • Plan your outfit the next 2 weeks. You don't want to leave dried skin everywhere, do you?
  • Don't wear nail polish before the peel. Baby Foot will cause it to melt (happened to me on day 2 of a fresh pedicure).
  • Don't put lotion or oil on your feet while it's peeling. It will delay the peel.
  • No matter how tempting it is, do not pick on the dry skin. You might peel skin that's not yet ready to come off.
If you haven't tried Baby Foot just yet, you're lucky if you're based in the Philippines since Beauty Bar sells it for only Php 830 (medium or large). If you're in the US, you can get it from Target.com or BabyFoot.com for $25.
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